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Md Mostakim Hossain
Jul 13, 2022
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But beyond just tapping into fond memories, here are five reasons why marketers shouldn't dismiss the humble jingle as irrelevant in the digital age: 1. Audio is an effective marketing tool In addition to jingles, look no further than the use of pop songs in advertising like, say, Train's Hey, Soul Sister. It's because [they have] a built-in familiarity and emotional connection, Young said. It's much easier today to tap into a beloved song and attach it to your product, transferring the feelings and emotions from the song to the brand. Advertising Continue reading below Additionally, for his part, Mc Cambley said he believes we will also see a resurgence of audio or sound branding on mobile, including tones or notes that consumers immediately associate with brands such as AT&T, Skype and Nokia. Jingles are yet another recognizable brand element This is because audio can also boost consumer recall. [A jingle is] a uniquely image masking service identifiable audio clip that functions similarly to a brand's slogan or even a brand's logo, said Matt Lee, chief marketing officer at the development agency. branding and inbound marketing Adhere Creative. And the best jingles reinforce messages like brand promise, legacy and consistency, said Scott Davis, chief growth officer at strategic consultancy Prophet. 3. Jingles, like pop music, are easy to remember But jingles are arguably the only branding element with the power to get stuck in our heads. Jingles still work for the same reason they worked in the past, said Michal Strahilevitz, associate professor of marketing at Victoria University. Whether it's a jingle or a pop song, if you play a catchy song over and over again with cute lyrics, people remember it. Advertising Continue reading below And, boy, do they. I've never had to replace my windshield, but I have the clink of Giant Glass from Massachusetts irrevocably stuck in my brain. I can't recite it because I have such an affinity for windshield repair, I can recite it because I watched too much TV as a kid and every commercial break during Red Sox games started with this song, said Ryan Coons, editor. at creative agency Struck. It's the same reason I can swear up and down that I can't stand Maroon 5, but somehow I still know the words to Sugar.
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Md Mostakim Hossain

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